Single Cell Technologies – Biointerfaces Institute

Description

This cluster focuses on the development of methods and technologies to probe a single cell.

The goal of this cluster is to build a synergistic scientific and technological platform to investigate one of the most critical building blocks of any biological system – a cell. Through the convergence of biology, computational approaches and engineering, the cluster addresses fundamental biological questions on cellular heterogeneity by developing integrated approaches and technologies to isolate, preserve, characterize and expand rare cells. This approach will enable investigation of basic biological components of single cells at a higher resolution and holds the promise of transforming the study, diagnosis and treatment of every disease. The cluster builds upon an existing ecosystem of UM investigators with complementary research excellence and active collaborations from engineering, physical sciences, life sciences and the medical school.

Project Team

  • Owner: Sunitha Nagrath (Engineering)
  • Joerg Lahann (Engineering)
  • Deepak Nagrath (Engineering, Medicine)
  • Evan Keller (Medicine)
  • Carlos Aguilar (Engineering)
  • Nicholas Kotov (Engineering)
  • Max Wicha (Medicine)
  • Gary Luker (Medicine, Engineering)

Interested in collaborating? Join this team


Neural Engineering – Biointerfaces Institute

Description

This cluster focuses on the development of methods to probe the nervous system and to generate novel neural interfaces.

Through a combination of expertise from biomedical engineering, computer science, electrical engineering and neuroscience, this cluster aims at understanding the nervous system. The ongoing research within the neural engineering cluster spans the central nervous system and the peripheral nervous system using computational as well as in-vivo models in pre-clinical and clinical settings. Research topics include electrode and prosthesis development, big data analysis of EEG, neuromodulation approaches.

Project Team

  • Owner: James Weiland (Engineering, Medicine)
  • Cindy Chestek (Engineering, Medicine)
  • William Stacey (Engineering, Medicine)
  • Tim Bruns (Medicine)
  • Scott Lempka (Engineering, Medicine)

Interested in collaborating? Join this team


Nanotechnology – Biointerfaces Institute

Description

Nanostructured materials represent the one of the five technological pillars of the Biointerfaces Institute. The focus of this work is on simulating nanomaterial self-assembly and developing the different kinds of nanotubes, nanoprobes, nanocatalysts and nanostructures for applications in medicine, energy conversion, and electronics.

Biointerfaces Institute researchers use nanostructured materials in drug delivery, neural interface, rare cell detection, different imaging modalities, and microfluidics organ replicas. Research groups from UM Medical School or Biomedical Engineering department focusing on the end-use therapeutics or diagnostics utilize nanoparticles developed by BI research groups specializing in particle synthesis. Some of the nanomaterials that developed in BI are unique to UM. They include “janus” biodegradable nanoparticles, iron sulfide (FeS2) nanoparticles, aramid nanofibers (ANFs), and biomimetic composites. Examples of ongoing projects taking advantage of unique properties of nanomaterials developed at the Biointerface Institute include selective targeting of breast cancer cells, long-term implants for brain recording, artificial bone marrow, single cell metabolism monitoring with SERS-active nanoparticle assemblies, and others.

Basic research on nanomaterials that is expected to advance the field of biointerfaces in the next 5-10 years includes replication of protein functions by inorganic nanostructures, theory and practice of nanoparticle self-organization phenomena, DNA mechanics, high-speed computer simulations of nanoparticle dynamics, membrane-particle interactions, and wetting at nanoscale interfaces. Considerable effort is also invested in understanding the challenges for scaled up manufacturing nanoscale materials and devices by bridging nanotechnologies with different types of high-throughput lithography and microelectromechanical devices.

Project Team

  • Owner: Nicholas Kotov (Engineering)
  • Somin Eunice Lee (Engineering)
  • Peter Tessier (Pharmacy, Engineering)
  • Colin Greineder (Medicine)
  • Sharon Glotzer (Engineering, LSA: Natural Sciences)
  • J. Scott VanEpps (Engineering, Medicine)
  • Anna Schwendeman (Pharmacy)
  • Michael Solomon (Engineering)
  • Ron Larson (Engineering)
  • Kai Sun (Engineering)

Interested in collaborating? Join this team


Cell and Tissue Engineering – Biointerfaces Institute

Description

Scientists in the Cell and Tissue Engineering Cluster are inspired to better understand fundamental principles of cell biology and exploit this knowledge to regenerate tissues and treat debilitating human diseases.

These efforts are supported by the daily interaction among basic scientists, engineers, and clinicians that creates an environment to innovate and discover. Current lab groups focus in the areas of tissue engineering, the role of tissue remodeling in the progression of metabolic and cardiovascular diseases, and human pluripotent stem cell and cancer stem cell biology.

Tissue engineering projects include design and fabrication of biomaterials as cell, protein or gene delivery devices, genetic engineering to direct cell and protein activity, and the development of multi-tissue interfaces. The metabolic modeling group focuses on the role of extracellular matrix remodeling (ECM) in the regulation of metabolism. By using genetically modified mouse models, three-dimensional (3-D) tissue culture, they work to define the molecular mechanism by which 3-D ECM remodeling regulates transcription, differentiation, and metabolic function in vitro and in vivo. Projects in the pluripotent stem cell group focus on how constituents of cell signaling pathways regulate transcription factors to balance self-renewal and cell differentiation in both human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells. The cancer stem cell group has elucidated a number of intrinsic and extrinsic pathways that regulate self-renewal and cell fate decisions in cancer stem cells and is translating these pre-clinical research findings into the development of clinical trials designed to target breast cancer stem cells.

Project Team

  • Owner: Joerg Lahann (Engineering)
  • Isabelle Lombaert (Dentistry)
  • Tae-Hwa Chun (Medicine)
  • Sunitha Nagrath (Engineering)
  • William Giannobile (Dentistry)
  • Lola Eniola-Adefeso (Engineering)
  • Max Wicha (Medicine)
  • Lonnie Shea (Engineering)
  • Evan Keller (Medicine)
  • Deepak Nagrath (Engineering)
  • Megan Weivoda (Dentistry)
  • Carlos Aguilar (Engineering)
  • Nicholas Kotov (Engineering)

Interested in collaborating? Join this team


Advanced Materials and Drug Delivery – Biointerfaces Institute

Description

The Advanced Materials and Drug Delivery Cluster Area seeks to create and apply cutting-edge biomaterials for high-impact biomedical applications and to create paradigm-changing approaches and systems for advanced drug delivery.

Novel biomaterials are created to solve critical issues of the field: guide tissue regeneration, design highly selective, robust and biocompatible sensors, and alter surface chemistry to improve tissue/device interfaces. Likewise, we thrive to deliver difficult drugs (proteins, peptides, siRNA, insoluble anticancer drugs, vaccine antigens) in a targeted manner and to hard-to- reach places (cancer cells, brain, eye, lymph nodes) for prolonged periods of time (controlled release) in order to maximize therapeutic efficacy.

Our efforts in biomaterials include designing novel polymer-protein and polymer lipid composites for sensing of influenza virus, prostate cancer antigen and antibiotics. Surface engineering of biomaterials can lead to creation of non-wettable surfaces to control protein and cell adhesion, stem cell culture and differentiation. We blend and modify biocompatible polymers to improve mucoadhesion and stability of entrapped drug molecules. We cross-link phospholipid bilayers and develop lipid-peptide complexes to alter cell processing of biomaterials. We collectively contributed to an extensive toolbox of drug delivery platforms such as mucoadhesive gels, biodegradable implants, multicompartmental polymer nanoparticles, cross-linked liposomes for antigen delivery, and lipoprotein nanodisks. These platform technologies deliver a wide range of drug molecules and vaccine antigens with a focus on large molecule stability and delivery.

Project Team

  • Owner: Steven Schwendeman (Engineering, Medicine, Pharmacy)
  • Joerg Lahann (Engineering)
  • James Moon (Engineering, Medicine, Pharmacy)
  • Jinsang Kim (Engineering, LSA: Natural Sciences)
  • Anish Tuteja (Engineering)
  • Peter Tessier (Engineering, Pharmacy)
  • Nicholas Kotov (Engineering)
  • Anna Schwendeman (Pharmacy)

Interested in collaborating? Join this team


Michigan Center for Materials Characterization – (MC)2

Description

The Michigan Center for Materials Characterization, also known as (MC)2, is the University of Michigan’s facility dedicated to the micron and nanoscale imaging and analysis of materials. The center, housed in Building 22 of the North Campus Research Complex, provides state-of-the-art instruments, professional training, and in-depth education for students and other internal researchers, fellow academic institutions, and local industry. (MC)2 supports a diverse multi-disciplinary user base of more than 450 users from various colleges and departments, 100+ internal research groups, and over 20 non-academic companies. 

Project Team

  • Owner: Emmanuelle Marquis (Engineering)
  • Bobby Kerns (Engineering)
  • Allen Hunter (Engineering)
  • Nancy Senabulya (Engineering)
  • Haiping Sun (Engineering)
  • Kai Sun (Engineering)
  • Deanna Wendel (Engineering)
  • John Heron (Engineering)
  • Rachel Goldman (Engineering, LSA: Natural Sciences)
  • Amit Misra (Engineering)
  • Nicolai Lehnert (LSA: Natural Sciences)
  • Molly MacInnes (LSA: Natural Sciences)
  • Virginia Larson (LSA: Natural Sciences)
  • Pierre Poudeu-Poudeu (Engineering)
  • Todd Randall Allen (Engineering)
  • Nicholas Kotov (Engineering)
  • Ashwin Shahani (Engineering)
  • Gary Was (Engineering)
  • Hui Deng (LSA: Natural Sciences)
  • Steven Yalisove (Engineering)
  • Joanna Millunchick (Engineering)

Interested in collaborating? Join this team


Integrated Approaches for Phenotyping Immune Cells

Description

We have strong interest in characterizing and profiling immune cells by integrating their secretory and cellular phenotype in real time.

Project Team

  • Owner: Deepak Nagrath (Engineering)
  • Sunitha Nagrath (Engineering)
  • Yu Leo Lei (Dentistry, Medicine)
  • James J. Moon (Pharmacy, Medicine, Engineering)
  • Jing Christine Ye (Medicine)
  • Anna A. S. Schwendeman (Pharmacy)
  • Venkateshwar Keshamouni (Medicine)
  • Christiane E. Wobus (Medicine)
  • Nithya Ramnath (Medicine)
  • Angel Qin (Medicine)
  • Malini Raghavan (Medicine, LSA: Natural Sciences)
  • Lonnie Shea (Engineering)
  • Pavan Reddy (Medicine)
  • Megan Weivoda (Dentistry)
  • Kelly Arnold (Engineering)
  • Beth Moore (Medicine)

Interested in collaborating? Join this team


Microfluidics in Biomedical Sciences Training Program

Description

The MBSTP is a National Institute of Health (NIH) / National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) funding training program that supports an interdisciplinary approach to graduate training that emphasizes biomedical microfluidics. The program supports 6 students each for 2 years. 45 faculty members from 20 different departments from the College of Engineering, the College of LSA, and the Medical School participate. Although the program only supports 6 students, all those interested are invited to participate in activities sponsored by the program including the annual symposium, seminar series, PIBS 503, and core course CHE 696. The program is designed to be an intellectually exciting blend of training in the more quantitative disciplines of chemistry, engineering, mathematics, and physics on the one hand and the basic biological sciences on the other. 

Project Team

  • Owner: Xudong (Sherman) Fan (Engineering)
  • Carlos Aguilar (Engineering)
  • Ryan C. Bailey (LSA: Natural Sciences)
  • Katharine Francesca Barald (Engineering)
  • David T. Burke (Medicine)
  • Mark A. Burns (Engineering)
  • Nikolaos Chronis (Engineering)
  • Lola Eniola-Adefeso (Engineering)
  • Jianping Fu (Engineering)
  • William V. Giannobile (Dentistry, Engineering)
  • Erdogan Gulari (Engineering)
  • L. Jay Guo (Engineering, LSA: Natural Sciences)
  • Robert Kennedy (LSA: Natural Sciences)
  • Katsuo Kurabayashi (Engineering)
  • Joerg Lahann (Engineering)
  • Lisa Larkin (Medicine, Engineering)
  • Ronald G. Larson (Engineering)
  • Somin Eunice Lee (Engineering)
  • Jennifer J. Linderman (Engineering)
  • Allen Liu (Engineering)
  • Gary D. Luker (Medicine, Engineering)
  • Jens-Christian D. Meiners (LSA: Natural Sciences)
  • Mark E. Meyerhoff (LSA: Natural Sciences)
  • Sunitha Nagrath (Engineering)
  • Kaushik Ragunathan (Medicine)
  • Leslie Satin (Medicine)
  • David H. Sherman (Medicine, LSA: Natural Sciences)
  • Ariella Shikanov (Engineering)
  • Michael J. Solomon (Engineering)
  • Jan Philip Stegemann (Engineering)
  • Nils G. Walter (LSA: Natural Sciences)
  • Kevin R. Ward (Medicine)
  • Euisik Yoon (Engineering)
  • Edward T. Zellers (Public Health, LSA: Natural Sciences)

Interested in collaborating? Join this team


Experiential Learning about Climate Change

Description

This cluster is aimed at promoting and expanding opportunities for experiential learning in the field of climate science. Activities will include the planning, preparation, and conduct of field expeditions with undergraduates to take and interpret measurements relevant to climate science. Planned expeditions in 2019, for example, include Greenland, to measure energy balance near the ice sheet and map places where the University of Michigan made initial measurements in the 1920’s, and “Tornado Camp” where students travel to the Great Plains to measure atmospheric conditions in the vicinity of supercell thunderstorms. In the future, this cluster will also help encourage and support engineering student travel to climate negotiation summits and new expeditions in concert with ongoing University of Michigan research.

Project Team

  • Owner: Perry Samson (Engineering, Information)
  • Mark G. Flanner (Engineering, LSA: Natural Sciences)
  • Jeremy N. Bassis (Engineering, LSA: Natural Sciences)
  • Richard B. Rood (Engineering, SEAS)
  • Ashley E. Payne (Engineering)
  • Christiane Jablonowski (Engineering)
  • Aaron Ridley (Engineering)
  • Frank Marsik (Engineering)
  • Krishnakumar R. Garikipati (Engineering, LSA: Natural Sciences)
  • Allison L. Steiner (Engineering, LSA: Natural Sciences)
  • Roger Dean De Roo (Engineering)

Interested in collaborating? Join this team


Autonomous Mobility

Description

The Autonomous Mobility Team is a convergent team of experts in a variety of fields related to autonomous mobility. The design, functionality, and operation of autonomous vehicles as intelligent cyber-physical systems require a convergent approach that integrates automotive engineering, control, dynamics, design, manufacturing, operations research, data science, computer science, social science, and political science to address cutting-edge technological developments in autonomous mobility. Our mission is to create fundamental knowledge that enables technological breakthroughs, and to integrate these in a system of systems approach. We aim to understand better the behavior of human-autonomy systems, to understand and predict the societal impact of such systems, and to enable the creation of policy, workforce development programs, and an innovation ecosystem to support the autonomous mobility of the future.

Project Team

  • Owner: Bogdan Epureanu (Engineering)
  • Huei Peng (Engineering, UMOR)
  • Kira L. Barton (Engineering)
  • Ram Vasudevan (Engineering)
  • Ilya Kolmanovsky (Engineering)
  • Dawn M. Tilbury (Engineering)
  • Necmiye Ozay (Engineering)
  • Lionel Robert (Information)
  • Alex A. Gorodetsky (Engineering)
  • Xi (Jessie) Yang (Engineering)
  • Brendan Kochunas (Engineering)
  • Yafeng Yin (Engineering)
  • M. Reza Amini (Engineering)
  • Xun (Ryan) Huan (Engineering)

Interested in collaborating? Join this team